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«Updated on 28 July 2015 Foreword This document has been produced by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to provide guidance for providers ...»

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Within the assessment criteria, the ability to perform an activity ‘unaided’ means without either the use of aids or appliances; or help from another person.

B Needs prompting to be able to engage with other people.

–  –  –

C Needs social support to be able to engage with other people.

For example: may apply to people who can only engage with others with active and skilled support on the majority of days, or who are left vulnerable due to their level of risk-awareness as a result of their condition.

Cannot engage with other people due to such engagement causing either – D i. overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant; or ii. the claimant to exhibit behaviour which would result in a substantial risk of harm to the claimant or another person.

‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is unable to function. This may occur in conditions such as generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, dementia or agoraphobia.

Activity 10 – Making budgeting decisions The aim of this activity is to assess whether the claimant is able to make budgeting decisions, either simple or complex.

Notes:

Complex budgeting decisions are those that are involved in calculating household and personal budgets, managing and paying bills and planning future purchases.

Simple budgeting decisions are those that are involved in activities such as calculating the cost of goods and change required following purchases.

Assistance in this activity refers to another person carrying out elements, although not all, of the decision making process for the claimant.

A Can manage complex budgeting decisions unaided.

Within the assessment criteria, the ability to perform an activity ‘unaided’ means without either the use of aids or appliances; or help from another person.

Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make complex budgeting B decisions.

This descriptor applies to people who need assistance with managing their household bills or planning future purchases. A level of vulnerability due to a cognitive or developmental impairment which leaves the person vulnerable as a result of not understanding everyday financial matters should also be considered.

–  –  –

Similarly, some individuals may lack motivation to carry out this activity and consideration must be given to whether this is as a result of a health condition or impairment and whether the individual would carry out the activity if they really had to, for example if they were to receive a final notice to pay a bill.

Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make simple budgeting C decisions.

‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: may apply to claimants who need to be encouraged or reminded to make simple financial decisions or who need assistance to manage simple budgeting independently.

D Cannot make any budgeting decisions at all.

3.4 Mobility activities Activity 11 – Planning and following journeys This activity considers a claimant’s ability to plan and follow the route of a journey.

As with all the other activities, a claimant is to be assessed as satisfying a descriptor only if the reliability criteria are also considered. The claimant must be

able to undertake the activity:

–  –  –

Notes:

This activity was designed to assess the barriers claimants may face that are associated with mental, cognitive or sensory ability.

Journey means a local journey, whether familiar or unfamiliar.

Environmental factors may be considered if they prevent the claimant from reliably completing a journey, for example being unable to cope with crowds or loud noises.

NB: in legislation, this activity is referred to as Mobility Activity 1.

A Can plan and follow the route of a journey unaided.

Within the assessment criteria, the ability to perform an activity ‘unaided’ means without either the use of aids or appliances; or help from another person.

–  –  –

For example, consider a claimant who manages to walk 5 minutes by herself to collect her child from school each weekday, despite her anxiety. She doesn’t need any support or assistance to do this, but does not leave the house on any other occasion without someone else with her. She is able to make a single journey 5 days a week without prompting, so would satisfy mobility 1a.

Needs prompting to be able to undertake any journey to avoid B overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant.

This descriptor applies to claimants where leaving the home and undertaking any journey causes overwhelming psychological distress and where they need prompting on the majority of days to be able to go out.

‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. ‘Prompting’ can take place either before or during a journey.

‘Any journey’ means any single journey on the majority of days.

‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is unable to function. This may occur in conditions such as generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, dementia or agoraphobia. In cases of agoraphobia, going out provokes anxiety but may still be possible with prompting. If agoraphobia is severe and the claimant is unable to go out even with support on the majority of days, descriptor E may be more appropriate.





A claimant who is actively suicidal or who is at substantial risk of exhibiting violent behaviour and who needs ‘prompting’ not to harm themselves or others when undertaking a journey would meet this descriptor. In cases such as this, there must be good evidence that the person is a high suicide risk by, for example, a high level involvement of community mental health services, care plan approach etc. In cases of violent behaviour there must be good evidence that they are unable to control their behaviour and that being ‘prompted’ by another person reduces a substantial risk of the person committing a violent act.

Does the claimant need prompting to be able to make any single journey on most days? In other words, if they get support from someone else, can they successfully make a journey on most days?

If so, descriptor B is likely to apply.

For example, a claimant who goes out to his local shop four days each week but needs to have his wife with him to be able to cope with this journey. He will sometimes try to go to his weekly physiotherapy appointment alone if his wife is working, but this causes him significant anxiety and he has only managed to cope with this once in the last month; he cancelled the other appointments rather than make the trip alone. He can go out on most days but requires prompting / support to be able to do so. He is only able to go out alone on occasion and very infrequently. He would therefore satisfy mobility 1B.

If, however, a claimant can undertake any single journey on the majority of days in the required period without prompting, for example, regular visits to the local shop to collect the daily paper, or regularly collect their children from school without support then they will not satisfy this descriptor, even if they are unable to undertake other journeys without prompting during the required period. The HP should ask clarifying questions of claimants who state they can undertake some journeys but not others without prompting to ascertain the reasons why and to obtain corroborating evidence where necessary. The HP should also explore what the claimant is “able” to do rather than what they “do” do. For example, a claimant who goes out twice a week – is this through choice, or because they need prompting due to overwhelming psychological distress? If it is the former then this descriptor will not apply.

C Cannot plan the route of a journey.

Applies to claimants with cognitive or developmental impairments, who cannot formulate a plan for their journey using simple materials, 8 such as bus route maps, phone apps or timetables, but who can follow a journey planned by someone else for example take a bus journey on their own. Such a person is likely to be able to ask for help with their route if the bus is diverted.

Cannot follow the route of an unfamiliar journey without another person, D assistance dog or orientation aid.

This descriptor is most likely to Apply to claimants with cognitive, sensory or developmental impairments who cannot, due to their impairment, work out where to go, follow directions or deal with unexpected changes in their journey when it is unfamiliar.

To ‘follow’ is the visual, cognitive and intellectual ability to reliably navigate a route. The ability to walk itself is assessed in activity 12.

Cognitive impairment encompasses orientation (understanding of where, when and who the person is), attention, concentration and memory.

A person should only be considered able to follow an unfamiliar journey if they would be capable of using public transport – the assessment of which should focus on ability rather than choice.

Any accompanying person should be actively navigating for the descriptor to apply. If the accompanying person is present for any other purpose then this descriptor will not apply.

Small disruptions and unexpected changes, such as road works and changed bus-stops are commonplace when following journeys and consideration should be given to whether the claimant would be able to carry out the activity if such commonplace disruptions were to occur. Consideration should also be given to whether the claimant is likely to get lost. Clearly many people will get a little lost in unfamiliar locations and that is expected, but most are able to recover and eventually reach their target location. An individual who would get excessively lost, or be unable to recover from getting lost would be unable to complete the activity to an acceptable standard.

Safety should be considered in respect of risks that relate to the ability to navigate, for example, visual impairment and substantial risk from traffic when crossing a road. If the risk identified is due to something else, such as behaviour, this descriptor is unlikely to apply.

Cannot undertake any journey because it would cause overwhelming E psychological distress to the claimant.

Applies to claimants who cannot undertake any journey on the majority of days, even with prompting or assistance, owing to overwhelming psychological distress.

‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. ‘Prompting’ can take place either before or during a journey.

‘Any journey’ means any single journey on the majority of days.

‘Overwhelming psychological distress’ means distress related to an enduring mental health condition or intellectual or cognitive impairment which results in a severe anxiety state in which the symptoms are so severe that the person is unable to function.

This descriptor is likely to apply to claimants with severe mental health conditions (typically severe agoraphobia or panic disorder) or cognitive impairments (typically a person with dementia who may become very agitated and distressed when leaving home, to the extent that journeys outside the home can no longer be made either at all, or on the majority of days).

If the claimant cannot go out even with prompting on most days – so despite encouragement or support, they still fail to make any journey on most days then this descriptor will apply.

For example, a claimant who only manages to go out once a week to the 24hour supermarket at 2am. They choose this time because it is quiet and they do not usually see anyone they know there. The rest of the week they remain at home due to their agoraphobia and anxiety. They have friends and family visit them at home, but even with encouragement and offers of support, the claimant is too anxious to go out at any other time during the week. Therefore, on the majority of days, they cannot make any journey even with prompting.



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