WWW.BOOK.DISLIB.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Books, dissertations, abstract
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 10 | 11 || 13 | 14 |   ...   | 18 |

«Updated on 28 July 2015 Foreword This document has been produced by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to provide guidance for providers ...»

-- [ Page 12 ] --

In a reasonable time period 3.3.33. Reasonable time period means no more than twice as long as the maximum period that a non-disabled person would normally take to complete that activity.

3.3.34. When looking at whether the individual can complete the activity in a reasonable time period, consideration should be given to the maximum period it is normally likely to take an individual without a health condition or impairment to complete the activity. In order to complete the activity within a reasonable time period, a claimant must take no more than twice this amount of time.

3.3.35. For each activity there will clearly be a range of times from those individuals who are very quick through to those who are much slower. There will also be non-disabled individuals who take an extremely long time to complete an activity; these should be discounted as they would not be covered by the reference to “normally”.

3.3.36. The following situations highlight examples where an individual may be considered unable to complete a descriptor in a reasonable time period due to their approach or the impact their health condition or

impairment has on them:

–  –  –

Worked example 1 3.3.37. Mr X is able to stand and move unaided. He can comfortably walk up to 150 metres at a normal pace. After 150 metres he starts to become breathless and to experience some mild pain. He can continue to walk but his pace slows. The pain and breathlessness gradually increases and after 250 metres he needs to stop and rest for about 5 minutes before starting to walk again. Mr X can repeatedly walk 250 metres, with short 5-minute rests in between for around an hour. After an hour of this, he needs a longer rest of about an hour before walking again. It takes Mr X around three minutes to walk 200 metres.

3.3.38. In the Moving Around activity, the HP should work their way through the descriptors considering each aspect of reliability, to find the one that best describes Mr X’s ability to complete the activity reliably.

–  –  –

3.3.39. Based on the initial information, the HP should consider awarding descriptor A but needs to consider whether Mr X can complete it

reliably:

–  –  –

3.3.40. The HP therefore concludes that Mr X can stand and then move more than 200 metres and selects descriptor A.

Worked example 2 3.3.41. Mr Y is able to stand and move with a walking stick. He can walk up to 50 metres at a slightly slowed pace with some discomfort. After this distance he starts to experience increasing hip pain. He can continue to walk, but his pace slows even further and after 100 metres he needs to stop and rest. This takes a lot out of him and for a few hours after, he is unable to go more than a few steps without experiencing further severe hip pain. It takes Mr Y between one and two minutes to walk 50 metres the first time.

3.3.42. In the Moving Around activity, the HP should work their way through the descriptors considering each aspect of reliability, to find the one that best describes Mr Y’s ability to complete the activity reliably.

–  –  –

3.3.43. The HP therefore concludes that Mr Y can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, and selects descriptor E.

Worked example 3 3.3.44. Ms Z can prepare and cook a simple meal. However she lacks a perception of danger and occasionally cuts herself from mishandling knives or burns herself on hot pans. She is also impatient and does not cook food for as long as it should be cooked, as a result she prepares food that is lukewarm and meat that is not cooked properly – for example, chicken that is pink in the middle. Her sister usually has to be in the kitchen when she is cooking meals to make sure she does so safely and to remind her to leave food to cook fully.

3.3.45. In the Preparing Food activity, the HP should work their way through the descriptors considering each aspect of reliability, to find the one that best describes Ms Z’s ability to complete the activity reliably.

–  –  –

3.3.46. In this case there are two possible descriptors – D and E. For a descriptor to apply, all aspects of reliability must be satisfied. As descriptor D does not describe a manner in which Ms Z is able to carry out the activity safely, the HP should select descriptor E.

3.3 Daily Living Activities Activity 1 – Preparing food This activity considers a claimant’s ability to prepare a simple, cooked meal for one from fresh ingredients. It is not designed to assess a claimant’s culinary skills, but to assess the impact of any impairment on their ability to perform the tasks required to prepare and cook a simple meal. It assesses ability to open packaging, peel and chop, serve food on to a plate and use a microwave oven or cooker hob to cook or heat food. Carrying items around the kitchen is not included in this activity.

Notes:

This activity considers the claimant’s functional limitations in their ability to prepare food and not the claimant’s lack of skill or the opportunity to learn. If an individual cannot cook at all because they have never needed to learn, consider their ability to carry out activities at or above waist height and their cognitive ability to use a stove or microwave if shown how.





Preparing food means the activities required to make food ready for cooking and eating, such as peeling and chopping.

Cooking food means heating food at or above waist height – for example, using a microwave oven or on a cooker hob. It does not consider the ability to bend down – for example, to access an oven.

Serving food means transferring food to a plate or bowl. It does not include presentation, or involve carrying food to where it will be eaten.

Where the claimant is reliant on pre-chopped vegetables, you should consider whether the claimant could peel and chop. If a person could peel and chop then, in the absence of any other relevant functional restrictions, they can prepare a simple meal unaided. If they could peel and chop with the use of an aid, they carry out preparation with aids. If the person uses pre-chopped vegetables because they couldn’t peel and chop even with an aid, they need assistance to prepare a simple meal.

When considering whether a claimant requires an aid or appliance, HPs should

distinguish between:

• an aid or appliance that a claimant must use or could reasonably be expected to use, in order to carry out the activity safely, reliably, repeatedly and in a timely manner; and

–  –  –

Descriptor advice in favour of an aid or appliance should only be given in the former case. An aid or appliance is not required in the latter.

Where a claimant chooses not to use an aid or appliance that he or she could reasonably be expected to use and would enable them to carry out the activity without assistance, they should be assessed as needing an aid or appliance rather than a higher level of support.

A Can prepare and cook a simple meal unaided.

–  –  –

Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a B simple meal.

In this activity, aids and appliances could include, for example, prostheses, perching stool, lightweight pots and pans, easy grip handles on utensils, single lever arm taps and spiked chopping boards.

Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do C so using a microwave.

–  –  –

Please note that this descriptor only refers to the cooking of a meal using a microwave, not the preparation of it. Ensure the claimant’s ability to prepare a meal is also taken in to account when considering if this descriptor applies.

–  –  –

‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person. For example: may apply to claimants who lack motivation to prepare and cook a simple meal on the majority of days due to a mental health condition, or who need to be reminded how to prepare and cook food on the majority of days.

E Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal.

For example: may apply to claimants who need supervision to safely heat or cook food using a microwave oven; or to claimants who cannot safely prepare vegetables, even with an aid or appliance. In cases of a risk of self-harm, there should be good evidence of the risk to the individual through, for example, high level involvement of community mental health services, care plan etc. This descriptor also applies to claimants who are unable to determine whether food is safe to eat – for example, that meat is properly cooked – due to sensory or cognitive impairment.

Supervision due to significant risk of self-harm or suicide intent is also captured by descriptor E.

F Cannot prepare and cook food.

This descriptor refers to the person’s functional ability in relation to any impairment and their cooking skills should not be taken in to consideration for this descriptor. If a claimant cannot cook but their functional ability indicates they could undertake tasks involved in preparing and cooking food then this descriptor would not apply.

Activity 2 – Taking nutrition This activity considers a person’s ability to be nourished, either by cutting food into pieces, conveying it to the mouth and chewing and swallowing; or through the use of therapeutic sources.

The type of food and drink for nourishment is not a consideration for this activity, but rather the claimant’s ability to nourish themselves.

The frequency of taking nutrition should only be considered if the claimant has an eating disorder, supported by further medical evidence.

Notes:

A therapeutic source means parenteral or enteral tube feeding using a rate limiting device, such as a delivery system or feed pump.

Spilling food can be considered, regular spillage requiring a change of clothes after meals is not an acceptable standard of taking nutrition.

When considering whether a claimant requires an aid or appliance, HPs should

distinguish between:

• an aid or appliance that a claimant must use or could reasonably be expected to use, in order to carry out the activity safely, reliably, repeatedly and in a timely manner; and

–  –  –

Descriptor advice in favour of an aid or appliance should only be given in the former case. An aid or appliance is not required in the latter.

Where a claimant chooses not to use an aid or appliance that he or she could reasonably be expected to use and would enable them to carry out the activity without assistance, they should be assessed as needing an aid or appliance rather than a higher level of support.

A Can take nutrition unaided.

Within the assessment criteria, the ability to perform an activity ‘unaided’ means without either the use of aids or appliances; or help from another person.

–  –  –

A key consideration when assessing whether supervision is required should be whether the claimant has a real risk of choking when taking nutrition.

–  –  –

C Needs a therapeutic source to be able to take nutrition.

For example: may apply to claimants who require enteral or parenteral feeding but can carry it out unaided.

D Needs prompting to be able to take nutrition.

‘Prompting’ means reminding, encouraging or explaining by another person.

May apply to claimants who need to be reminded to eat (for example, due to a cognitive impairment or severe depression), or who need prompting about portion size. Prompting regarding portion size should be directly linked to a diagnosed condition such as Prader Willi Syndrome or Anorexia. In cases where obesity is a factor through the claimant’s lifestyle choices then this descriptor would not apply.

Needs assistance to be able to manage a therapeutic source to take E nutrition.

For example: may apply to claimants who require enteral or parenteral feeding and require support to manage the equipment.

–  –  –

Activity 3 – Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition

This activity considers a claimant’s ability to:



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 10 | 11 || 13 | 14 |   ...   | 18 |


Similar works:

«S T R U C T U R A L A N D F U N C T I O N A L A N A LY S I S O F I M M U N I T YA S S O C I AT E D G T PA S E S Dissertation zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades des Doktors der Naturwissenschaften (Dr. rer. nat.) eingereicht im Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie der Freien Universität Berlin vorgelegt von david schwefel aus Heidelberg Die vorliegende Arbeit wurde von Juli 2007 bis Oktober 2010 am Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin unter der Anleitung von jun.-prof. dr. oliver...»

«Aus der Zahnklinik 1 Zahnerhaltung und Parodontologie Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg Direktor: Professor Dr. A. Petschelt Einfluss der Etch-and-Rinse-Technik auf Adper Easy Bond Inaugural-Dissertation Zur Erlangung der Doktorwürde der Medizinischen Fakultät der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität ErlangenNürnberg vorgelegt von Thorsten Kunstmann aus Nürnberg Gedruckt mit Erlaubnis der Medizinischen Fakultät der Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg Dekan:...»

«Cryl-A-Clean SAFETY DATA SHEET 1. IDENTIFICATION Product Identifier: Cryl-A-Clean Recommended use: Floor Surfacing Dur-A-Flex, Inc.Manufacturer Name: 95 Goodwin Street East Hartford, CT 06108 860-528-9838 Telephone number: Emergency phone number: 1-800424-9300 (CHEMTREC) Date of Preparation: July 17, 2014 2. HAZARD(S) IDENTIFICATION Classification: Physical Health Flammable Liquid Category 2 Skin Irritation Category 2 Skin Sensitization Category 1 Specific Target Organ Toxicity Single Exposure...»

«Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover Center for Systems Neuroscience Hannover Pathogenetical factors contributing to high IgA levels and marked neutrophilic pleocytosis in canine Steroid-responsive Meningitis-Arteritis Thesis Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PhD) at the Center for Systems Neuroscience Hannover awarded by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover by Malte Schwartz...»

«HOW TO MANAGE AND CONTROL ASBESTOS IN THE WORKPLACE Code of Practice DECEMBER 2011 Safe Work Australia is an Australian Government statutory agency established in 2009. Safe Work Australia consists of representatives of the Commonwealth, state and territory governments, the Australian Council of Trade Unions, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Australian Industry Group. Safe Work Australia works with the Commonwealth, state and territory governments to improve work health...»

«Aus der Elisabeth-Klinik Bigge Fachklinik für Orthopädie und Rheumatologie Leiter : Professor Dr. Dr. Axel Wilke des Fachbereich Medizin der Philipps-Universität Marburg in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg GmbH Standort Marburg Acoustic Emission Measurement System in Diagnostic of Cartilage Injuries of the Knee Inaugural-Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades der gesamten Humanmedizin Dr.med. dem Fachbereich Medizin der Philipps-Universität Marburg...»

«1 Technical Report for the reference: Horvath S, Xu X, Lake SL, Silverman EK, Weiss ST, Laird NM (2004) Family based tests for associating haplotypes with general phenotype data: application to asthma genetics. Genet Epidemiol, Vol 26, No 1, 61-69 Family Based Tests for Associating Haplotypes with General Phenotype Data: Application to Asthma Genetics Steve Horvath1,2, Xin Xu3, Stephen L. Lake4, Edwin K. Silverman4,5, Scott T. Weiss3,4, and Nan M. Laird6 Departments of Human Genetics,...»

«Goetheanum Freie Hochschule für Geisteswissenschaft Medizinische Sektion Internationale Koordination Anthroposophische Medizin / IKAM Research Council Koordination: Dr.med. Peter Heusser An die Interessenten und Mitarbeiter auf dem Gebiet anthroposophisch-medizinischer Forschung Liebe Freunde, die Aufstellung von Forschungsprojekten und publizierter Literatur zeigt Ihnen den aktuellen Stand der Forschungsumfrage 2004 zur Anthroposophischen Medizin. Bei der Literatur haben wir die zugesandten...»

«On Embryonic Stem Cell Research A Statement of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Stem cell research has captured the imagination of many in our society. Stem cells are relatively unspecialized cells that, when they divide, can replicate themselves and also produce a variety of more specialized cells. Scientists hope these biological building blocks can be directed to produce many types of cells to repair the human body, cure disease, and alleviate suffering. Stem cells from adult...»

«Medizinische Fakultät der Technischen Universität München Klinik für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie Lehrstuhlinhaber: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Peter Henningsen Noceboresponse in randomisierten kontrollierten Medikamentenstudien des Fibromyalgiesyndroms und der schmerzhaften peripheren diabetischen Neuropathie Claas Bartram Vollständiger Abdruck der von der Fakultät für Medizin der Technischen Universität München zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades eines Doktors der Medizin...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.book.dislib.info - Free e-library - Books, dissertations, abstract

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.